Tornado Season Will Be Upon Us Soon
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Tornado Season Will Be Upon Us Soon

Tornadoes can occur almost anywhere, but they are more prevalent in the central and eastern United States. The NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) reports that every year approximately 80 people die in tornadoes and over 1500 people are injured each year. They report that every year the United States have about 800 tornadoes.

Tornadoes can occur almost anywhere, but they are more prevalent in the central and eastern United States.  The NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) reports that every year approximately 80 people die in tornadoes and over 1500 people are injured each year.  They report that every year the United States have about 800 tornadoes.

Tornadoes are so damaging because their winds sometimes top 250 miles per hour.  Tornadoes can lift houses off their foundation and turn them into little more than match sticks.  Tornadoes often occur in the spring and summer months, but they can also occur in the winter months when the conditions are right.  Tornadoes usually form during thunderstorms, but not always.  Conditions are favorable for tornadoes when a warm air front moves into a cold front.  In the central US it is quite common for the air masses to move along the eastern side of the Rocky Mountains. 

By the time we see tornadoes they are full of dust and debris, which gives them their gray or brown color.  When a tornado first forms it may not be easily seen because it can be clear or near clear.  They don’t always become very visible until they pick up cloud formation in their winds, along with the debris that is on the ground.

Another type of tornado that forms over water is called a water spout.  You can spot them because the water spout is formed in the air.  They are really quite beautiful to see.  These are much weaker than the tornadoes mentioned above.  Even though water spouts are weak, they can move inland and turn into a stronger tornado.

How do tornadoes develop?

It’s an interesting bit of physical science that explains how tornadoes form.  The conditions have to be right.  There are spinning currents of air in the lower parts of our atmosphere that develops into a rotating updraft of wind. The speed of the spinning increases as the cloud rises.  There is usually a wall cloud that promotes the rotating winds to form and develop into a tornado.

Because tornadoes can occur anywhere in the US and around the world, we depend on the National Weather Service to alert us where tornadoes may occur or where they have been seen.  Meteorologists are checking the radars regularly to spot any storm that may occur.  Although, tornadoes can happen any time of the year, they are most prevalent through March to May. 

Tornadoes are very serious weather patterns.  If you get an alert for a tornado warning, find cover.  If you stay in your home, try to get into a central place in your home, such as in a bathroom.  If you live in a mobile home, it might be best to leave your residence and find a shelter to go to, or a neighbor’s home that has a storm cellar.

Source:

http://www.nssl.noaa.gov/edu/safety/tornadoguide.html

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Comments (7)

Charlene, thanks for the heads up, voted!!! xoxoxo

Thank you Diane.

Informative. Thanks for sharing.

We are lucky not to have tornado here but we have heavy typhoons and earthquakes here.

Good write up, Charlene. We are thinking alike.

Tornados are frightening. I remember being near the one in Edmonton, AB, back in the 80's it was something we had never had in the area before.

excellent article

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